Village Creek

Village Creek Restoration Project - 2014 Final Supplemental Monitoring Report

May & Associates, Inc.
2014

This report documents supplemental performance monitoring for the Village Creek restoration project.

Village Creek Restoration Project - 2007 (Year 1) Habitat Monitoring Report

May & Associates, Inc.
2008

This report documents the baseline monitoring for the Village Creek restoration project.

Village Creek Restoration Project - 2012 (Year 5) Habitat Monitoring Report

May & Associates, Inc
2012

This report documents the 2012 (Year 5) monitoring for the Village Creek restoration project.

Village Creek Restoration Project - 2013 Supplemental Monitoring Report

May & Associates, Inc.
2013

This report documents supplemental performance monitoring for the Village Creek restoration project.

Village Creek Restoration Project - 2008 (Year 2) Habitat Monitoring Report

May & Associates, Inc.
University of California, Berkeley
2008

This report documents the 2008 (Year 2) monitoring for the Village Creek restoration project.

Oakland Museum Watershed Map - Meeker Slough

Oakland Museum
2006

A map of the historical waterways of the East Bay.

Reference: 

Reference the Oakland Museum Watershed Map - Legend.
Go to the Oakland Museum's Creek Mapping Project for more maps and information.

Restoration Projects

Several restoration projects have occurred on both Codornices Creek and Village Creek. The following is a rough description and approximate timeline of these projects. For more detailed information, go to Featured Publications and/or the Searchable Database to find archived reports.

Codornices Creek:

  • 1994: Installation of a 430-foot-long stream daylighting project between 8th and 9th Streets

History (Codornices & Village Creeks)

Codornices Creek is a year-round creek that flows east-west through the southern edge of University Village, Albany. It drains a 1.1 square mile watershed that historically entered a tidal marsh just west of the current railroad tracks. Codornices Creek is one of the most "open" creeks in the East Bay, with only 20 percent of its channel culverted. This makes it a prime candidate for restoration activities.